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jdavidb (1361)

jdavidb
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http://voiceofjohn.blogspot.com/

J. David Blackstone has a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering and nine years of experience at a wireless telecommunications company, where he learned Perl and never looked back. J. David has an advantage in that he works really hard, he has a passion for writing good software, and he knows many of the world's best Perl programmers.

Journal of jdavidb (1361)

Thursday August 26, 2004
09:36 AM

Homeschooling myths challenged

[ #20578 ]

Our church has four families that have been or will be homeschooling children. Interestingly, none of them are homeschooling for religious reasons. (Well, unless you count the family that was in Ukraine for two years doing mission work ... but the mother had been a public school teacher, and when they returned, one son entered public school immediately, and the other returned after a year.) In fact, the other three families (I'm counting ours even though we have no children yet) have been or will be homeschooling one child while another attends public school.

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  • I've a friend whose sister announced she would be homeschooling her son to keep him away from those who might corrupt him (yeah, it was a religious thing.) She had an interesting conversation with her brother.

    Sister: "Could you tutor your nephew in math for me? You know math much better than I do."
    Brother: "I can't support my nephew being homeschooled by you! You think France is a city!"
    Sister: (long pause) "But France is a city."

  • Yeah, homeschooling is one of those odd things where both the extreme left and extreme right have a tendency to have common resources and goals. One of my left-ish friends homeschooled his kids, and had lots of conversations with right-ish homeschoolers as well. Interesting.
    --
    • Randal L. Schwartz
    • Stonehenge
    • This is one of the things I really like about homeschooling. There are so many different points of view. As long as all subscribe to the fundamental mantra of homeschooling, in my mind, "Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children," I appreciate what they are doing and love looking at the diversity for cross-pollination of ideas.

      Somewhere I read somebody saying the tree-huggers (or some similar offensive term for leftist environmentalists) paved the way, the religious funda

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children

        And... everyone is above average [freep.com] too.

        On a more serious note, being the best judge of how to do it (which I don't agree with... but let's just pretend for a moment) still doesn't make you the most capable person of doing it.

        I personally will be home schooling my kids... every day after they get home from school. I will add to their learning experience.

        Not shield them from it.

        It seems to me that this is the real purpose for many po
        • On a more serious note, being the best judge of how to do it (which I don't agree with... but let's just pretend for a moment) still doesn't make you the most capable person of doing it.

          Exactly. Which is why, if you'll look at other comments I've made, you'll see that I insist that homeschooling is not for everybody. It is up to the parents to decide what is best for their children, and act accordingly.

          For example, my wife was homeschooled, and her parents and some other homeschooling parents got to

          --
          J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
          • Way to not read what I said. My whole point was that of these four families involved in homeschooling, not a one of them was doing it to "shield" or "shelter" their children.

            I did read what you said. (Understanding... well that is a different matter.)

            I also tried to write my response in such a way as to not imply I was talking about you or your situation in particular. Looks like I failed.

            The only part about you specifically I was referring to was the quoted comment, which I saw you commented about else
            • I also tried to write my response in such a way as to not imply I was talking about you or your situation in particular. Looks like I failed.

              I understand that. I'm just saying that you seemed to be generalizing that shielding kids is often or usually the reason for homeschooling kids ... the whole point of my journal entry was that that is changing.

              But, the other point I was trying to make is that I don't see how replacing an educational experience is better than augmenting the experience.

              Er, wel

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
              • Would you question a parent who moved a kid from one school to another for replacing the educational experience instead of augmenting it?

                No. (To answer your question.)

                I wouldn't even question a parent that home schools... hell, someone has to work for my kid. ;-)

                But, I also don't consider moving a kid from one school to another to be the same as removing a kid from school to home school instead. (My first reaction would probably be to move from a public school to a private school.)

                The reason I don't co
        • I personally will be home schooling my kids... every day after they get home from school. I will add to their learning experience. Not shield them from it.

          How is teaching kids shielding them learning? I could just as easily say, by sending your kids off to school during the day, you are shielding them from opportunties they could otherwise have.

          What your statement assumes is that sending a kid to a school is the best or default way for them to learn these things, or that it is somehow something people
          • How is teaching kids shielding them learning?

            Taking them out of formal school so that they won't experience something (political, religious, social) is the shielding I was referring to.

            The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

            If you can't deal with exposing your kid to a theory, you have a serious problem, IMHO. At the very least, teach them to refute the damn thing. But, to completely limit exposure?

            What you
            • The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

              OK. But that is the very small minority in my experience.

              Although, I would note that public schools are not allowed to teach religion in this way ... :-)

              My proposition is that A + B > B for all cases. (Likewise, A + B > A for all cases.)

              Where A and B represent useful knowledge, I cannot agree. Sure, my kids can learn some things in school they won't learn at h
            • The only case I've personally experienced was where someone started home schooling because they didn't want their kid taught evolution.

              Well, conveniently, now that you have read my journal, only 20% of the cases you have heard about are for that reason. The four families I mentioned are homeschooling for other reasons.

              If you can't deal with exposing your kid to a theory, you have a serious problem, IMHO. At the very least, teach them to refute the damn thing. But, to completely limit exposure?

              Who

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
            • I've really got to agree with pudge's case that a lot of school is a waste of time. (He seems to perhaps be saying 100% of school ... I'd have to make the percentage somewhat lower.)

              I have an informal list of "reasons that made it easier for me to choose homeschooling." This list isn't written, yet; it consists of things that I just did not like or do not like about the system of schooling; these are not items that constitute reasons why I am going to homeschool, but things that made it easier for me to

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
              • I've really got to agree with pudge's case that a lot of school is a waste of time.

                I would agree. I was bored out of my gourd in high school.

                I rarely did homework... had 18 zeros one quarter in my English Comp. class.

                Still graduated 26th (of ~450) in my class.

                It was a totally horrendous waste of time, in my view, at the time.

                And, I would totally agree that it needs to be imporved.

                BTW, what in this post says anything about shielding kids from evolution?

                Nothing in your post. I brought that up from m
    • There's not much extreme about homeschooling anymore.

      What's sad is that anyone would even think of it as extreme in the first place. Homeschooling should be normal, should be the default.

      I don't accept things just because society tells me I should. I don't say, yes, you will go to school because that is what is expected, I ask, what benefit is there in you going to school? What are the pros and cons? The pros are few and far between, and the cons are many.

      merlyn, as someone who is quite intelligent a
      • Homeschooling should be normal, should be the default.

        I just can't help thinking that I don't want the people I see at the grocery store being the sole source of education for their kids.

        merlyn, as someone who is quite intelligent and has been very successful without attending college, you should understand how unimportant formal education is.

        Is? Perhaps you mean: can be?

        Unimportant? Perhaps you mean: unnecessary?

        Otherwise, it looks like a logical [datanation.com] fallacy [datanation.com] to me. (Ironically, I wouldn't have known t
        • I just can't help thinking that I don't want the people I see at the grocery store being the sole source of education for their kids.

          And I don't want Britney Spears as a role model for kids. Life is not about my will. :-)

          Is? Perhaps you mean: can be? Unimportant? Perhaps you mean: unnecessary?

          Well, I think I used the correct words, but don't wish to spend time arguing it; I readily concede that my intended meaning apparently matches the words you think I should have used. For the record, I am sayin
    • I don't have this impression; replace "extreme right/left" by anarchist and "center" by authoritarian and I'll agree. (as global tendencies, not as labels)
    • Yes, we didn't join the "underground railroad" and start "unschooling" our children until the late-70s (and continuing through high school age [1996]; when we first started, "unschooling" was considered "illegal" but now "unschooling" is legal in all 50 states) but had had quite an introduction to the concept early on (early-60s through early-70s) in reading Paul Goodman's Growing Up? Absurd! and Compulsory Miseducation, all of John Holt's works (through 1989 [posthumously] - too lengthy a list to include
      --
      Not knowing what to do, they do what they know . . .
  • There is good and bad in everything. I support homeschooling, I will be homeschooling my children but that doesn't mean that I think "everyone" should homeschool nor should some people who are now homeschooling be homeschooling.

    I do not think the government should be able to tell parents how to school their children though.

    • I support homeschooling, I will be homeschooling my children but that doesn't mean that I think "everyone" should homeschool nor should some people who are now homeschooling be homeschooling.

      I agree with that. It's a matter of parent choice, more than anything.

      I was reading something recently on a religious homeschooling mailing list, where a woman was upset that her sister-in-law had been saying ever since her children were born she was going to homeschool them, but was now taking steps to get them

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
  • My wife and I are Christians, but we don't homeschool our kids to keep them shielded. Both of us had a poor education from the public schools and we decided they deserved (much) better. Well, that and she has the temper for it. My son is now 14, he's not socially inept, and could go to college right now with his SAT scores, so it seems to have worked. There is an awful lot of FUD spread about homeschooling.

    Stangely enough, I've heard some Christians denounce homeschooling because they want their kid i

    • Both of us had a poor education from the public schools and we decided they deserved (much) better.

      Heh; I had a great education at our public schools, and I still plan for my kids to be homeschooled. :)

      Stangely enough, I've heard some Christians denounce homeschooling because they want their kid in school so they can evangelize other public school kids.

      Guilty as charged. Although actually I said it against private Christian schooling, not against homeschooling. I don't say it any more.

      Strangel

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • "Stangely enough, I've heard some Christians denounce homeschooling because they want their kid in school so they can evangelize other public school kids."

      That is the wrong reason to send your child to school. The majority of children even when properly instructed by parents cannot withstand an all day assualt by the school and peers.