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jdavidb (1361)

jdavidb
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http://voiceofjohn.blogspot.com/

J. David Blackstone has a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering and nine years of experience at a wireless telecommunications company, where he learned Perl and never looked back. J. David has an advantage in that he works really hard, he has a passion for writing good software, and he knows many of the world's best Perl programmers.

Journal of jdavidb (1361)

Wednesday October 15, 2003
08:39 AM

A thought

[ #15219 ]

Today we are all Chinese.

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  • This morning the radio woke me up announcing the visit of the Dalai Lama in Paris. Just a thought...
    • Re:All? (Score:3, Interesting)

      Well, I figured if people could say it about America, we could say it about China. I didn't mean I condone the People's Republic of China. In fact, I don't even condone the forcible confiscation of wealth to fund space exploration (the way it was done over here, too). But I am happy that mankind has made another stride into space.

      I won't let this good act be overshadowed by other evil actions. I'm sure the Chinese scientists involved in this launch are quite worthy of respect.

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • And indeed I thought it was amusing (as in "funny", "laugh") that I read you writing this just a few hours after being reminded of the existence of somebody who fights since dozens of years to not be a Chinese. No trolling was intended.

        FWIW I'm happy also that new steps are made in space exploration. And I don't see why the Dalai Lama wouldn't be too. As you say the people responsible for the oppression of his nation are surely not involved at all in the Chinese space program, and vice versa.

        • And indeed I thought it was amusing (as in "funny", "laugh") that I read you writing this just a few hours after being reminded of the existence of somebody who fights since dozens of years to not be a Chinese. No trolling was intended.

          I understand. I knew there'd be political issues in my statement, but was actually thinking more about offending Taiwanese and their friends than Tibetans and theirs. Also thought about offending conservatives (of which I am one) by the play on the phrase from Septembe

          --
          J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • Re:All? (Score:2, Insightful)

      The Dalai Lama in Paris? Were there demonstrations, calls for the removal of his travel documents and immediate expulsion?

      I know some people in France consider religion an "Unnecessary Evil".

      ...Or maybe it's just the Christian religion? That must be it. No one would dare apply the term "Evil" to any religion except for Christianity, certainly not Buddhism, certainly not Islam. No, that would be considered insensitive.

      • Firstly, the Dalai Lama is considered here more as a political authority (the lead of the resistance against the Chinese assimilation and colonization of Tibet) than an religious one. In spite of their colorful folklore, there are very few Tibetan Buddhists on the planet currently.

        Secondly, your assertion that atheism or agnosticism may lead to religious intolerance is just pure FUD. If you want to find a country were the Dalai Lama would be unwelcome on the sole basis of his religious opinions, you'd bett

          • Firstly, the Dalai Lama is considered here more as a political authority (the lead of the resistance against the Chinese assimilation and colonization of Tibet) than an religious one...

          Ask the Dalai Lama if he considers himself to be a religious leader or a political leader. I think you'll find that he considers himself to be both [tibet.com].

          • In spite of their colorful folklore, there are very few Tibetan Buddhists on the planet currently.

          I think you'll find the Dalai Lama is one of these Tibetan Buddhists. The

          • The Dalai Lama might consider himself -- and be considered by Tibetans -- as a religious authority, that's usually not revelant when he's received by political authorities in non-Buddhist countries, including India, where he lives. I very much doubt that Bush, receiving him at the White House not so long ago, considered him as a religious authority. Neither does Debré.

            And you're surely joking when you're asserting that Robin's game of words about the well-known idiom "necessary evil" was to be taken

            • I'm sure you're right about this. Being European and thus far more worldly and informed that a silly American like myself.

              I expect it's just a mistake that the President's press Secretary insisted that he was a spiritual and religious and not a political leader [whitehouse.gov]:

              Q Ari, is the President prepared to press China on Tibetan rights? And why didn't he meet with the Dalai Lama in the Oval Office, why in the Roosevelt?

                        MR. FLEISCHER: The President met with him in the

      • ...Or maybe it's just the Christian religion? That must be it. No one would dare apply the term "Evil" to any religion except for Christianity, certainly not Buddhism, certainly not Islam. No, that would be considered insensitive.

        No need to rush things, folks -- I'll hate everyone's pouty religion soon enough! I'm just spread thin at the moment, so I can't do them all at once.

        How about this: This week I'll take a deep breath and despise all scriptural monotheism in one go (including Bahai, Mormonism, etc, as well as the usual suspects, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam), then next week I'll sit and fume and mutter about fundamentalist Hindus, and for the week after I'll pencil in some special events where I look askance on Moonies, Sikhs, Oprah, Zoroastrians, Macintosh, and Voodoo. Thanks for your patience! You will all be despised evenly, I promise!

          • This week I'll take a deep breath and despise all scriptural monotheism in one go (including Bahai, Mormonism, etc, as well as the usual suspects, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam),

            ...

            You will all be despised evenly, I promise!

          If your aim is to inspire equal amounts of ire in every religious group, I think I should warn you that you are in danger of gaining extra anger from the Mormons, and perhaps slightly less distress from certain other Christians, by implying that the Mormonism is distinct from Ch

  • I can only assume you're referring to the Chinese successfully launching a taikonaut? If so, I have to say that I am extremely happy to see this. If, in fact, the rumors that China wants a lunar outpost are true, I will be one of the first to cheer them on. I can not say that I am a particular fan of China or the terrible things that they have done, but I am happy for humankind to be seriously reaching for space again.

    Time to find some old Heinlein to read.

    • The only problem I have is this silly "taikonaut" word. I understand that Chinese feelings are hurt that there's a special English word for Russian astronauts, so they want their own word too, but where do we draw the line? Do we need a new word every time a new country launches someone into space? The proper solution is to stop using "cosmonaut" and call everyone "astronauts". (And the Russians can stop using "астронавт" and use "ко