Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

jdavidb (1361)

jdavidb
  (email not shown publicly)
http://voiceofjohn.blogspot.com/

J. David Blackstone has a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering and nine years of experience at a wireless telecommunications company, where he learned Perl and never looked back. J. David has an advantage in that he works really hard, he has a passion for writing good software, and he knows many of the world's best Perl programmers.

Journal of jdavidb (1361)

Friday February 28, 2003
10:17 AM

Fair use

[ #10837 ]

A little while ago, I was copying a page out of Mastering Oracle SQL to leave on someone's desk. I happened to know the topic, inline views, would get him particularly excited.

Someone wandered by and jokingly said you were cheating if you copied a book. In his mind, I presume, what I was doing was legally wrong, though not morally, and something to be winked at. Not so. "It's fair use," I explained, and commented that such small excerpts were completely legal. What a myth the copyright cartels have forced on us!

What a reassurance it was to think that Tim O'Reilly understands and respects fair use rights, and that if this really were a serious issue, he would back me up. Besides, copying that single page has a good chance of causing more purchases of the book.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Besides, copying that single page has a good chance of causing more purchases of the book.

    Careful... that's the "pirates" sleaze-logic that completely ignores that the right to do that still belongs with the copyright holder, and if they (not you) believed it to be true, would give explicit permission to do so.

    Not to say that one page doesn't fall under the fair-use clauses of copyright... so you're probably safe on that account. But don't fall into the "I know better than the publisher about what w

    --
    • Randal L. Schwartz
    • Stonehenge
    • Ah, yes; I understand. I'm just representing, I hope, what would be Tim O'Reilly's personal view of my specific action, had he been present.

      I'm interested in being a law-abider, and also in having rational laws.

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • So, please, what makes this fair use?
        I have no knowledge of copyright law, but have been hearing about not being allowed to
        copy a page out of a book since I was in high school.
        Do you have any references as to what makes this fair use?
        Please note that this reply is prompted by curiosity , and not criticism! :->

        Dave
        • Re: Fair use? (Score:3, Informative)

          "Fair use" actually has a precise legal definition, although the components are subject to judicial interpretation. See what the Copyright Office has to say [copyright.gov].

          And now that I look at that, it would be hard to simply copy a page out of a technical book for your own use under that definition. So, I will now backpedal. {grin}

          --
          • Randal L. Schwartz
          • Stonehenge
          • such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

            Well, I'd say this falls under many of those. Particularly news reporting. Mainly, I wanted the other guy in the office to know I had a book that had that information in it. I highlighted two relevant sentences. I also copied just the first page about the topic, not the whole section. There's not really much useful on that page other than, "This is possible, here's how you can --"

            This is fun. :)

            --
            J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers