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gnat (29)

gnat
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Journal of gnat (29)

Sunday June 09, 2002
09:43 PM

Blighted

[ #5527 ]
A developer (THF) wants to build a Stupor Wal-Mart where a residential neighbourhood now stands. The residents wouldn't sell. A company hired by the developer declared it blighted. This clears the way for the city to seize it under eminent domain, then sell it to the developer and roll naked in the resulting Wal-Mart tax dollars. Boy, that sure sounds fair!

We should jump in cars at YAPC and see exactly what a blighted neighbourhood looks like. Then we can drive by the headquarters of THF and see what corporate pirate motherfuckers look like.

--Nat

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  • Hey, if you want to organize a protest I'm all for it.

    I found the linked article a bit disturbing in that the conclusion the author seemed to reach was "this sucks because it might drive my property values down".

    I think the correct conclusion here is "the fact that government and corporations are in bed together sucks because corporations will fuck everyone over to make a buck."

    Seems to me that the latter is a _lot_ more scary than the former.
    • Didn't everyone know that goverment and corporations are in bed together with the end result of fucking over the consumer/voter. The reason is that they are so successful is that people will see a gain in the short term and forget about the long term.

      Everytime they build a new Walmart people lose jobs and those interesting little shops dissapear. But then who cares if you have the convenience and can save a few bucks?

      The scary thing is, what can we do about it?

      • Well, one (relatively) easy thing you can do is spend money like it matters, cause it does.

        I for one don't shop at Walmart, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or any other big chain stores, inasmuch as is possible. I make a point of going to neighborhood shops, although for some things I just don't know of a small locally-owned business to go to!

        But at least for things like books, CDs, movies, food, etc. I can easily avoid the big ugly companies like the above.

        This is probably the single most effective protest
  • ew, that sucks. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ask (83) <ask@develooper.com> on 2002.06.10 0:15 (#9383) Homepage Journal
    My dad is researching urban planning and that kind of thing for a living. Some years ago he worked on a report[1] about how big mega stores destroys cities. Of course the dynamics in Denmark are different (and not as messed up as here in the US), but even there it's screwed up how corporations can play out cities against each other to get to build their mega malls, even when everyone is aware that it's good for noone.

          - ask

    [1] I think "worked on" in that case was 3-4 years; wew, long attention span! :-)
    --

    -- ask bjoern hansen [askbjoernhansen.com], !try; do();

  • Yes.
    --
      ---ict / Spoon
  • That sound just like something some SoCal friends of mine recently told me about [ocregister.com].

    There, a church owns land and is planning to build some sancutary/auditorium, but the city decided a Costco would be better, and is trying to steal the land via eminent domain.
    • Of course, this is okay because they are religious people and we have separation of church and state, so the state should take action to make sure that the church is not seen within its borders.

      <grumble, grumble, grumble>

      It's too little, too late, but see my other post I just made in this thread about the Castle Coalition. Maybe they would get involved in this.

      500 church members at a protest!?!?! If we had that many members, I certainly couldn't imagine anyone trying to take our land away.

      T

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
  • Some time back I found The Castle Coalition [castlecoalition.org], an ACLU-like organization run by libertarians (they're okay, really! it doesn't rub off!) who fight eminent domain abuse. I have been suspicious of eminent domain since I first read the U.S. Constitution circa sixth grade and an outright hater of the law since 1997 when eminent domain was used to force some people out of their homes in Hurst, a neighboring city to mine, to build additions to the mall. (We went on to have a landmark turnout for our next local e

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I think that being against the government's right to seizure of land by eminent domain is like being against the government's right to declare and conduct a war. It's a useful tool that is sometimes necessary but should only be used when necessary. It doesn't make much sense to me to hate it or be against it, although it makes perfect sense to be against its abuse.

      That said, I think this group you mention makes some incorrect claims. They say that Amendment V of the Constitution of the United States of
      • I think that being against the government's right to seizure of land by eminent domain is like being against the government's right to declare and conduct a war. It's a useful tool that is sometimes necessary but should only be used when necessary. It doesn't make much sense to me to hate it or be against it, although it makes perfect sense to be against its abuse.

        Excellent thought for me to chew on. Of course, some people on this net seem to be against the government's right to declare a war. ...

        I

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
        • Those are certainly abuses of the spirit of eminent domain, but not necessarily the actual law. I tried to explain the U.S. Constitution only prohibits the federal government from seizure of land for private use, and that this isn't even specifically enumerated, but is merely generally understood.

          The courts have consistently held for many years that the rights afforded citizens of the United States must be protected by the States as well (see Amendment XIV, Section 1). However, since there is no Right to