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gnat (29)

gnat
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Journal of gnat (29)

Saturday January 05, 2002
03:28 PM

Note to self

[ #1936 ]
Machines on the LAN use DHCP. The firewall box uses DHCP to get its IP address (from the ATT server) and runs dhcpd to hand out IP addresses (in 192.168.*.* range) to LAN machines. If a LAN machine gets a bizarre IP address that wasn't handed out by the firewall dhcpd, don't assume ATT's server is responding. Many machines (OS X and Windows 98 to name two) appear to randomly assign addresses if nobody responds. Bungholes!

--Nat

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  • ... that's a feature. The weird one hundred and sixty something dot something dot something dot something addresses is what the standards says they should take when the dhcpd doesn't answer.

    I forget, but I think it's something so computers in a tiny network can network with ip without any configuration or dhpc servers.
    --

    -- ask bjoern hansen [askbjoernhansen.com], !try; do();

    • I forget, but I think it's something so computers in a tiny network can network with ip without any configuration or dhpc servers.

      D'oh! That makes perfect sense. One of those situations where it's useful in a rare situation but a hindrance in the common situation. Well, I presume that using a DHCP client when you have a DHCP server is the common situation :-)

      --Nat