Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

domm (4030)

domm
  (email not shown publicly)
http://domm.plix.at/

Just in case you like to know, I'm currently full-time father of 2 kids, half-time Perl hacker, sort-of DJ, bicyclist, no longer dreadlocked and 33 years old

I'm also head of Vienna.pm [pm.org], maintainer of the CPANTS [perl.org] project, member of the TPF Grants Commitee [perlfoundation.org] and the YAPC Europe Foundation [yapceurope.org].

I've got stuff on CPAN [cpan.org], held various talks [domm.plix.at] and organised YAPC::Europe 2007 in Vienna [yapceurope.org].

Journal of domm (4030)

Friday April 01, 2005
04:02 AM

Austrian vs German ways of saying 'goodbye'

[ #23969 ]

Yesterday I called the Austrian LEGO callcenter (to renew my sons subcription to their club magazine). While I called an Austrian number, I ended up in Germany (easily recognisable by the agents accent). I gave them the necessary infos and endend the phone call by saying 'Auf Wiederhoeren'. Which is the proper formal way of ending a phone call with someone you do not really know. In Austria, at least.

The call center agent finished the German way, which is: 'Tschuuueehhhuuuees!' (more sung than said).

Now, 'Tschuess' is a rather informal way of ending a conversation in Austria. You only use it with friends. Yet it is totally accepted in Germany, even if talking to total strangers.

When I lived in Berlin some time ago, I was constantly feeling like a dork after saying 'Auf Wiedersehen/hoeren'. I felt very old-fashioned.. Yet I still perfere 'Auf Wiedersehen/hoeren' to 'Tschuess' (at least when speaking to strangers).

Oh, it happens the other way round, too. A friend of mine who is living in Berlin for several years once called his old professor at the Viennese university. He ended with 'Tschuuueehhhuueess!', heard his prof stutter 'Auf Wiederhoeren' (sounding slightly annoyed..) and thought 'Damn, he'll think I have no manners' ...

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Now, 'Tschuess' is a rather informal way of ending a conversation in Austria. You only use it with friends. Yet it is totally accepted in Germany, even if talking to total strangers.

    I wouldn't second that. I never came across the utterance of "Tschuess" over the phone when talking with a stranger. And I'd be as taken aback as you if I did hear it.

    However, it may be more common here in face-to-face communication. So you hear it frequently when you leave a shop or so. I however prefer "Tschoe" over "Tschue