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cogurov (5192)

cogurov
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cogurov doesn't really exist. If he did, he would only have three letters anyway, not seven.

all he does here is rant about nothing and everything

Journal of cogurov (5192)

Tuesday December 14, 2004
09:46 AM

Why are things always so complicated?

[ #22304 ]

So the latest news are: my current employers want to know what would be the minimum conditions (money, that is) for me to consider staying.

Why? Why do these things always have to happen? Couldn't everything be just plain simple?

Now I'm supposed to say that, so that they can come with a new offer for me.

To tell the truth, I'm not very interested in staying, at this point. Plus, I already told the guys in Lisbon I'd be working for them from January on.

So on one hand we have money, OTOH we have what I'd like to be doing.

I really have no clue at all as to what I should do...

If I choose the money, I doubt that I'll get another chance as this one any time soon, and I know I'll be working like hell. If I choose Lisbon, I already know that things will be a little bit complicated in terms of money...

What am I going to do?

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  • I'd make the move.

    You've already made the commitment to the new company - the time to use it honourably as a bargaining chip at the old company is past.

    You'll be a lot happier with the work you do and the conditions at the new job.

    Happiness is more important than money as long as the money is sufficient to meet your basic living needs. (Which is redundant - a sufficiently inadequate money supply eventually drives up frustration and unhappiness.) It is easier to contend with restricted money using a

    • I'd make the move.

      I will. I already talked to the guys up here.

      You've already made the commitment to the new company

      Even though I did not mention that, that was one of the things on my mind :-)

      You'll be a lot happier with the work you do and the conditions at the new job.

      I certainly hope so... because that's why I'm moving there! :-)

      Happiness is more important than money as long as the money is sufficient to meet your basic living needs.

      Then let's just hope I'll be happy and that my new sal

      • If it turns out that the money really is too small, you can discuss it with your new employers. Changing jobs has shown that it wasn't just a negotiating tactic - you haven't burned any more bridges by changing than you already have by getting a job offer - so you could talk with the old company about getting hired back. (So, I'd say you've chosen the chance with the possibility of huge benefit, while retaining a fall-back chance of smaller benefit. Staying for more money right now would have taken the s
      • Then let's just hope I'll be happy and that my new salary will be able to meet my basic living needs in Lisbon :-)

        Well, if that's the case, and the new company cannot upgrade your salary, there always other Perl shops around.

        No, I'm not offering nothing :)

        --
        life is short
  • I can't believe they asked you that.

    They should just have asked you why you were leaving,at least an honest answer to that might help them keep hold of any other quality employees they have had the good fortune to acquire.
  • Tell them that you'll do contract work. (If you really want to keep the connection.)

    You'll make some extra dough, they'll get quality work from someone they already know.

    Everyone will be happy.
    • Everyone will be happy.

      Except for the company where I already said yes, and for me, too, because I really want to go :-)

      • Sorry, I probably wasn't clear enough.

        Go. Take the new job. Do contract work for the old employer on the side.

        They get work from someone they know and trust. You get to skip the bs and focus on the "real" part of the job.

        The only real problem is them wanting more from you than you are willing to give. But, that is the beauty of contracting. It actually becomes a negotiation again instead of the Boss - Slave relationship.

        Again, only if you want to.