Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

chromatic (983)

chromatic
  (email not shown publicly)
http://wgz.org/chromatic/

Blog Information [technorati.com] Profile for chr0matic [technorati.com]

Journal of chromatic (983)

Friday May 08, 2009
09:03 PM

Oh, and One More Thing

[ #38942 ]

Unfortunately in 2000 the Perl developers lost touch with the real world and started to develop the perfect scripting language, Perl 6. They're still at it, apparently. Meanwhile Perl 5 has become hopelessly outdated. It lacks elegant OO and a good web framework, to name only a few downsides.

Steven Reiz, Groovy is the new Perl / Java / ...

Since 2000, the Perl developers have also developed (to my knowledge) the most advanced and comprehensive language testing ecosystem in the world.

Oh, and (also to my knowledge) the largest collection of reusable and redistributable software components in existence (though admittedly, it's only grown tremendously a few times over since 2000, having begun a few years before).

That's not to mention a few other interesting pieces of technology, such as Moose, lexically overridable grammars, roles, metaoperators, parametrized roles, and did I mention you can use all of them in working software today?

Its syntax is so compact (there is some truth in the joke that every randomly typed string of characters is a valid Perl program) that maintainability suffers.

Oh. Oh, snap. This one's clearly done serious research.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • ... he lost all credibility the moment I read his claim that Ruby on Rails is irrelevant because unlike Groovy it isn't based on Java. The rest was similar garbage.
    • I can believe "irrelevant in our local context", if all of his deployment and monitoring infrastructure assumes (or requires) the presence of a JVM and its ecosystem, but sometimes the best response to willful ignorance masquerading as helpful advice is very specific mockery.

  • I've made a new post on my blog ( http://time-investment.reiz.nl/2009/05/groovygrails-versus-perl-continued.html [time-investment.reiz.nl]) , trying to go into a bit more detail of why I think the Groovy/Grails versus Perl comparison has this outcome (a win for G/G). It's difficult to be really really objective in comparisons like this, and I guess none of us even try very hard. Still, I wanted to say that I have a lot of respect for the Perl community and CPAN. At the same time, I also have a lot of respect for the people who buil
    • Thanks for responding.

      I don't care if you like Groovy or Grails. If they're appropriate for your business, great. If Perl's not appropriate, that's fine too.

      I do care, very much, if you propagate myths and baseless rumors about projects I work on. Well-researched and well-reasoned discussions are fine. I don't believe you've said anything more than "I don't like Perl" and "I don't think it can work."

      I have a lot of respect for the Perl community and CPAN.

      I'm not sure you understand either one.

      You've ch