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barbie (2653)

barbie
  reversethis-{ku. ... m} {ta} {eibrab}
http://barbie.missbarbell.co.uk/

Leader of Birmingham.pm [pm.org] and a CPAN author [cpan.org]. Co-organised YAPC::Europe in 2006 and the 2009 QA Hackathon, responsible for the YAPC Conference Surveys [yapc-surveys.org] and the QA Hackathon [qa-hackathon.org] websites. Also the current caretaker for the CPAN Testers websites and data stores.

If you really want to find out more, buy me a Guinness ;)

Links:
Memoirs of a Roadie [missbarbell.co.uk]
[pm.org]
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Journal of barbie (2653)

Tuesday June 28, 2005
07:08 AM

Curry

[ #25401 ]
Last night Little India on Queens Street won out from a choice of three Indian restaurants. Mainly due to the choice, but also price. Interestingly the choices here seem to be very different than in the UK, even excluding the Balti. There are some common dishes, or at least commonly named dishes, althoughly I suspect others just have different names but are in fact the same. In my experience most European Indian restaurants have been Tandoori, and it seems to be the same in Canada. Not that that's bad, just that there a lot more styles of cooking in India than just Tandoori. In the UK we are fortunate to have a selection.

I opted for Samosas for starters and the Lamb Karachi Gosht with garlic Naan. A medium spiced curry with a very thick sauce. I heartily recommend it for anyone who doesn't like things too hot. Personally I like to taste the spices not burn my mouth out, much as the Indians themselves do. If you ever have a meal cooked by an Indian family you'll discover that they are usually mild or medium curries and it's the flavours that are essential ingredients not the chili powder.

Depending on what happens on Wednesday night, I might be tempted to try another Indian :)

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  • We are cooking a lot with curry at home now days. I really like the smell and taste. There is a cafe behind the Dept of State in DC that serves up chicken and rice dishes with red or green curry. Very yummy.
    • That sounds like a Thai curry, which are generally a lot milder. Thai curries are also water based rather than using the traditional oil based cooking, so are probably a lot healthier too. They have some great flavours and I have been know to enjoy both on many occasions, although I think I prefer the green curry :)
      • In my experience Thai currys are generally hotter than indian. I wonder why our experiences differ.

        The guy who runs the Thai restaurant in Gloucester told me that he serves most dishes "medium" (he offers the dishes spiced either "medium", "hot" or "thai" which is how his wife would cook it for Thai people - herself being Thai). I like to opt for the "thai" but only if I'm feeling adventurous because it sure is hellishly hot.
  • If you ever have a meal cooked by an Indian family you'll discover that they are usually mild or medium curries and it's the flavours that are essential ingredients not the chili powder.

    That depends on the family. I ate lots of very hot food when I visited India. Besides, "Indian food" is a gross overgeneralization. There are many many different food traditions in India. In the States at least, you can sometimes find "South Indian" restaurants that are pretty good. And which typically serve hot foo

    • Actually if you have a traditional meal, you'll find that there are complete mixture of food. They often mix hot and sweet food together so as not to burn the mouth.

      However, in the UK too many think you guage a curry by how much chili powder you can stand.