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acme (189)

acme
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http://www.astray.com/

Leon Brocard (aka acme) is an orange-loving Perl eurohacker with many varied contributions to the Perl community, including the GraphViz module on the CPAN. YAPC::Europe was all his fault. He is still looking for a Perl Monger group he can start which begins with the letter 'D'.

Journal of acme (189)

Monday April 11, 2005
04:52 PM

CPAN Testers and Versions

[ #24134 ]
One of the sites I manage is CPAN Testers. This shows test reports for all your modules, and one of the things that has been bugging me is how to sort versions. I want the most recent versions first, but how do I figure out what crazy versioning scheme the author has used? Well, I don't need to any more, using the brand new Parse::BACKPAN::Packages, which looks at BACKPAN and thus lets me sort the versions in the order that they were released to CPAN. Here's a few interesting cases:

Note that version numbers are almost as hateful as licenses, schemas and in fact, software. And now I can ignore them! By using superior technology, I don't have to think about versions at all, thus making me much happier (and lazier!). Yay!

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  • That was bugging me too, but gave up thinking about it, hoping someone else could think of a decent way of doing it. Never thought to look at BACKPAN :)
  • Looks like you're still having problems with the numbering for CGI.pm .....

    Linked from CPAN Testers Index [cpan.org]
    Linked from CPAN [cpan.org]

    Someone really ought to patch the Makefile.PL to either remove DISTNAME or fix it to fit with the rest of the CPAN naming conventions.

    • Pet peeve: people who "report" bugs in journals, on perlmonks, IRC, web forums, user group meetings, etc. I do it to. Its human nature to feel that you have voice the bug therefore your obligation is done.

      Put it on rt.cpan.org or the author is unlikely to ever even know there's a problem.
      • But it's not a bug. It's doing exactly what MakeMaker allows it to. It might be an annoyance for listing on cpan-testers, but it's not wrong.

        I use rt a lot. But I use it for posting patches and real bugs. Personal preferences for numbering systems and naming conventions don't belong there.

        • Pet peeve #2: People who will not report issues using a module because they assume its by design and not a "bug". Or because they have found a bug but have not yet formulated a patch.

          Report early, report often. Feedback is critical.

          Let the author know because otherwise they live in their own little world and think everything's a-ok. It might be a bug or "accidental feature". This sort of thing happens all the time in MakeMaker where I break something obscure and people don't report it because they fi
  • superior technology

    You're deluding yourself. It's still software, and thus hateful [hates-software.com]

  • Time-PT 1.0.42M3ChX

    That's version 1.0 released on 2004-02-22 03:12:43:33.

    year 4 2004
    month 2 Feb
    day M 22
    hour 3 03
    minute C 12
    second h 43
    millisec X 33

    The date from 2000-2062 expressed as a human readable 7 digit base 64 number with millisecond accuracy. Very clever. Of course it really has NO business being in a CPAN version (the author has already had this explained to him, he doesn't care so don't bother).

    PS The proper alpha sequencing is 1
  • You're getting a time relation from backPAN, and using it appropriately; but this technique should not be assumed to indicate that a more recent release of a module necessarily supercedes an earlier one.

    For a counter-example, look at perl itself, which has regular bugfix/patch subreleases of a number of older release branches.