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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Saturday August 03, 2002
02:18 AM

Big bucks, overnight fame - and millions of lives saved

[ #6872 ]
Dear Log,

«McMichael and his team have taken an entirely different road, inspired by the discovery of prostitutes in Kenya who remained HIV-negative in spite of frequent sex with infected men. The Kenyan women were remarkable not for their antibodies but for the high levels of what are known as killer T-cells - those white blood cells that divide and attack other cells that have been invaded by a virus. The Oxford vaccine, now in trials there, in London and in Nairobi, uses DNA to trigger a strong killer cell response. The results in mice have been good. Now the vaccine is being tested in healthy people with no likelihood of exposure to HIV. In two to three years, it could face the crunch test in people at risk. "It will be about five to six years before we know if it works," says McMichael.»

--"Medicine's holy grail: The race is on for an Aids vaccine. The prize? Big bucks, overnight fame - and millions of lives saved."

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  • It's eerie how closely this news story matches the plot of a novella [amazon.com] written by Norman Spinrad in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. His story is so obviously about AIDS, even though he never mentions the name of this disease. Somehow, Spinrad manages to be both politically correct and salacious at the same time. (All in all, it's no great shame that the book is out of print...)

    The gist of the story is that the epidemic began to fade once a mutant strain of the virus developed in a prostitute; it wa