Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Thursday April 11, 2002
04:40 AM

Quantifier float

[ #4109 ]
Recently I went to burn a backup of the non-binaries in my c:/windows directory. The CD burner software at one point said that two of the files were open and locked by another process, so press "OK" to skip them. OK. Burn burn burn.

Minutes later, when the burning is complete, an error message in the status window: "All data was not saved".

I said "What? Nothing was written?!?"

And then I remembered: Picture the programmer as a Freshman English student. You know, the kind who writes things like "from whence", and "however it happened" when he means "however, it happened". And then it all makes sense: the programmer meant "Not all data was saved." I.e., some of the files (which it told me about) were skipped.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Interesting link you posted there, you its MEGO factor was rather high for me. (Incidentally, that construction you mentioned is also one of my pet peeves... probably brought on by my father's rather prescriptive attitude to grammar which he tried to instill in his children.)
    --

    -- 
    Esli epei eto cumprenan, shris soa Sfaha.
    Aettot ibrec epesecoth, spakhea scrifeteis.

    • That's one of my pet peeves, too! Try expressing that construction in symbolic predicate logic and see what people are actually saying compared to what they mean.

      And while I'm ranting, "a lot" is two words. After all, you wouldn't say, "alittle," would you? (Been griping about this since I first saw it in 1989.)

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers