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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Tuesday April 09, 2002
10:59 PM

Ethnonyms

[ #4076 ]
Dear Log,

«"We don't want to be Latin in that pejorative way," the head of a fashionable thinktank told me.»

Amazing how words for ethnic groups (or groups-of-groups) get tossed around with little or no sense. The Americas south of the US are called "Latin America" even tho most of it is about as Latin as New Guinea is. France flirts with this idea of "etre latin". I never cease to be amazed at how many "Arab" countries there are, as if the Arabian penninsula suddenly swelled astonishingly. And I always grind my teeth when I hear French people refer to "Anglo-Saxons" when they mean "English-speakers".

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  • Not that it doesn't grind my teeth too (and I possibly hear it much more often than you do ;), but "Anglo-Saxon" is used more to describe a certain culture revolving around twisted ideas of what freedom is or mind-numbing work ethics. It is still a wrong term, but I haven't heard it yet used to talked about English speakers (which given what it designates, would also be a wrong term).

    --

    -- Robin Berjon [berjon.com]