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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Tuesday May 11, 2004
06:28 PM

Hasn't changed in a thousand years

[ #18707 ]
Dear Log,

Hither:

«I remember when Bush in the famous debate in Iowa said that Jesus Christ was his favorite political philosopher. I always thought the problem was not with that answer, which is a legitimate answer. But when he was asked to explain this, he basically said, "If you haven't had this experience, you don't know what it is."

I was offended by that, because I thought, in a sense, in a tolerant democracy, a politician has an obligation to explain things to people who don't necessarily accept their religious terms.

I had an assistant at the time who was a Democrat, no friend of Bush's, but an evangelical Christian. She was upset with me, because she said, "That's how we talk. You should understand that." I think it's those moments, when Bush speaks like that, that evangelicals know in their hearts that he's one of them.»

-- E.J. Dionne, interviewed in Frontline's episode on Bush's religiousness

And yon:

«I think, fundamentally, many of these Evangelical and social Christians like George Bush. They like what he's done on partial-birth abortion, they like what he's done in terms of appointees, they like what he's done in the war.

I was down in Georgia the other day talking to some pastors; and when I talk to them about the war in Iraq, they understand fundamentally, in ways that George Bush does not talk about, that this is part of a millennial crusade -- Bush got in trouble using the word "crusade" -- You talk to to some pastors in suburban Atlanta, they understand that this war is against the Muslems, against the Infidel, in a way that in fundamental ways hasn't changed in a thousand years.

They see that this is the president who's engaged in something bigger than just this moment. »

-- a Fresh Air interview with Wayne Slater, who appears in Frontline's episode on Bush's religiousness

I'm achingly tired of being trapped in other people's country-fried mythologies. It's like being confined to a fur con, except they're running the country. It's like Ren-faire Taliban.

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  • Everyone has their own mythologies. If the guy in charge shared yours, then the rest of the country would be annoyed. Boo-fricking-hoo.

    As to Dionne ... the problem is that when evangelicals give the real answer, non-Christians say it sounds ridiculous, or doesn't make sense. It's a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation. But I think Dionne's analysis beyond that is astute.