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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Monday August 18, 2003
04:12 AM

Nemesis 4: This Time It's not Nemesis 3

[ #14173 ]
Dear Log,

I'm starting to think that loathing Thomas Friedman is something I should leave to the professionals and the armies of armies of seething amateurs (odiateurs?). That frees up my time for other things.

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  • From the article [cliosociety.com]:

    I can only compare the sensation of reading The Lexus and the Olive Tree to the first time I heard Newt Gingrich speak publicly and it began to dawn on me that this is what the ruling class calls thinking, that this handful of pathetic, palpably untrue prejudices are all the ruling class has to guide it as it shuttles back and forth between the State Department and the big think tanks, discussing what it means to do with us and how it plans to dispose of our nation.

    Zing!

  • From Frank's article:

    « Most revealing is Friedman's understanding of the United States itself, a country in whose image markets quite naturally wish to remake the world. In a closing chapter Friedman asks us to wonder with him at how "a visionary geo-architect" (i.e., God) would go about designing the ultimate nation, how He would insist that it have "the most flexible labor market in the world," that all manner of rebellions and zany lifestyle accessories be tolerated in the boardroom as the signs

  • I don't know where Friedman went wrong ... it wasn't 9/11, it was before that. But I have found it best to listen to what he has to say, not how he says it -- when that's possible -- which is why I prefer to listen to him than read him, because he is forced to get to his point a lot more quickly.

    I think maybe the only thing about him that has changed since 9/11, that I have noticed, is that he seems to think more of himself, which might be a big part of the problem. A guy that Tim Russert (IIRC) dubbed "