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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Tuesday February 18, 2003
01:54 PM

Things I Forget

[ #10651 ]
Dear Log,

Things I constantly forget, and always have to look up:

  • my zipcode, 99824 ("You can see my house from here!")
  • the lyrics to Hava Nagila:

    ( Hava nagíla * 3 | Vénis mekhá. ) * 2
    ( Hava neránena * 3 | Vénis mekhá. ) * 2
    U, ru, uru akhím,
    Uru akhím belév saméakh * 2
    Uru akhím, uru akhím, belév saméakh.

  • That carrots are a fun snack, more addictive than potato chips.
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  • ( Hava nagíla * 3 | Vénis mekhá. ) * 2

    Not quite. Vénismekhá should be one word, as in "and let us be happy":

    Smecha, as in the root for happy;
    nismecha as in the passive verb "let us be happy";
    v'«mumble» as in the prefix "and mumble".

    Hebrew has a lot of words where you string together a slew of prefixes and suffixes to a simple three-letter root to make something nearly unpronouncable, yet rather precise. (And it's much worse with biblical hebrew.)

    • > Hebrew has a lot of words where you string together a slew of prefixes and suffixes to a simple three-letter root to make something nearly unpronouncable, yet rather precise.

      Hey, that sounds a lot like Finnish :-) Though Finnish uses suffixes much more than prefixes.
      And tacking on the suffixes can (and most often does) mutate the root.

      • Hey, that sounds a lot like Finnish :-) Though Finnish uses suffixes much more than prefixes. And tacking on the suffixes can (and most often does) mutate the root.

        Hey, maybe the Finns are the mythical 13th lost tribe of Israel. :-)

        Hebrew doesn't use much in the way of prefixes. The few that are used are generally conjunctions or prepositions: the, and, with, in, to, from. Possessives are suffixes, as are most artifacts of verb conjugation. There are a few prefix/infix orthographic changes, but s

      • Since we saw Hebrew, let me try some Finnish sample... hmm... translation for "(not) even in my wildest dreams" would be "hurjimmissa kuvitelmissanikaan":

        hurja - wild
        hurjin - wildest
        hurjimmissa - the 2nd -i is plural, and the -ssa is the "in"

        kuva - picture, image
        kuvitella - imagine
        kuvitelma - dream
        kuvitelmissa - again, -i is plural and -ssa is the "in"
        kuvitelmissani - and -ni we already went through
        kuvitelmissanikaan - the -kaan is the "(not) even", kind of

        So... wild-superlative-plural-in image

  • * That carrots are a fun snack, more addictive than potato chips.

    Oh, don't I know it. If I eat too many carrots, I get a stomach ache that can last for days.