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TorgoX (1933)

TorgoX
  sburkeNO@SPAMcpan.org
http://search.cpan.org/~sburke/

"Il est beau comme la retractilité des serres des oiseaux rapaces [...] et surtout, comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d'une machine à coudre et d'un parapluie !" -- Lautréamont

Journal of TorgoX (1933)

Wednesday February 12, 2003
07:24 AM

mmmm fried things

[ #10540 ]
Dear Log,

«The enterprising motorist was, so the reports suggested, running his diesel-engine motor on a mix of Asda cooking oil and standard fuel. At 42p a litre, the supermarket chain's oil is considerably cheaper than the 73p a litre that even a discounted retailer charges for diesel. The astonishing thing was it worked. Without any need to modify the engine, the motorist could run his car on the mix with no discernible difference in its performance. What's more, instead of diesel fumes, the engine gave off a rather pleasing odour - like frying time at the local chippy.»

--"Fry and drive"

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  • the government is not amused by cheap alternative fuel.

    I think quotes like that really sum of the problems of government interference in our lives, not to mention the hypocrisy of governments that want to save the environment.

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • Well, I seem to recall reading that the reasoning was that there were no road-related taxes being charged (which of course has a lot to do with why the price for the frying oil was much less than the real fuel).

      • The article goes on to mention that even after the proper rates of duty have been paid, the vegetable oil is cheaper. The duty being lower than petrol as it is environmentally friendlier.

    • I certainly understand the frustration with impersonal, authoritarian bureaucracies. I think it's important to recognize, however, that governments are not the only such creatures that affect our lives. The experience of dealing with the local phone company can be just as frustrating. And you have even *less* control over the actions of a company than you do over the government.

      The worst part is when you have to spend every day laboring in a organization that is organized in a dysfunctional, heirarchica
      • Yes, everything people say about government is equally true about corporations, in even creepier ways.

        we *do* need to find ways to organize ourselves to effectively use (not abuse) shared resources.
        I sometimes (and just sometimes) think that the hope for better organization, while well intended, is almost a distraction from getting people to be more compassionate and less legalistic. Maybe the trick is to convince people that organization, rules, and procedures are just the starting points for get

        • Thanks for responding. Makes me feel less like a lunatic. This isn't entirely coherent, but I tried. :)

          People are affected greatly by the situation they find themselves in. Obviously they are not powerless to form themselves, but they can't totally ignore their circumstances. Most people find themselves somewhere in the middle of various heirarchies. They are always aware of how far they could still fall, and the importance of following orders so they don't fall. Popular culture is also full of "upwa
  • I forwarded this story to a good friend of mine, who happens to be a mechanical engineer, and specializes in diesel engines (in the U.S.). Here was some information he provided:

    1) People generally drive fewer miles per year than in the US due to high fuel costs and good public transportation. 12,000 to 15,000 miles per year is pretty common in the US, but somewhat unusual for a European. At that rate, mechanical problems due to biodiesel could take years before they are seen.

    2) Most of the diesels