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TeeJay (2309)

TeeJay
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http://www.aarontrevena.co.uk/

Working in Truro
Graduate with BSc (Hons) in Computer Systems and Networks
pm : london.pm, bath.pm, devoncornwall.pm
lug : Devon & Cornwall LUG
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Journal of TeeJay (2309)

Thursday October 31, 2002
04:03 AM

tasted php, not as nice as perl

[ #8693 ]
I tried PHP properly for the first time this week.

Starting at the weekend, I downloaded a load of the Introductory Articles (and a bunch of the advanced ones too) from O Reilly's PHP dev centre.

Then I started porting my very-lightweight-cms from perl to php.

My first impression was that error reporting (something PHP considers a selling point, why?) is poor - marginally better than ASP.

My next impression was that the few error reports you do get are unhelpful.

Further impressions are :

  • Object Orientation ? PHP objects seem to lack constructors, destructors, multiple inheritance and differentiation between attributes and methods.
  • Database Access ? PHP lacks any decent Database access - you pass around a bunch of variables that aren't handled in a nice abstracted OO way like DBI and require different functions for different database!

Overall I am very disappointed, although I have to admit PHP is better at a technical level than ASP - I managed a hell of lot more in an hour of ASP/VBScript than PHP despite not knowing VB and knowing Perl and C.

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  • PHP has constructors. They're just named after the class and have some oddities (such as handling the return of the object magically). And attributes and methods are distinguishable: methods have () after them.

    There are PHP classes for abstracting database operations. I ended up writing my own DBI-ish one, though, which I suppose I should put out there some time.