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Ovid (2709)

Ovid
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Stuff with the Perl Foundation. A couple of patches in the Perl core. A few CPAN modules. That about sums it up.

Journal of Ovid (2709)

Friday July 24, 2009
04:29 AM

SQL Keywords Are Not Good Column Names

[ #39341 ]

In retrospect, my accidentally naming a column after an SQL reserved word ("key") was pretty stupid and now I have a fair chunk of code to change.

But I briefly toyed with the idea of keeping a straight face and telling people it was defense-in-depth against SQL injection attacks. It would be fun to see how many people would buy that rationale.

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  • I once had to deal with a table named "group" (though I didn't name it). The database had been around far too long to think about changing it.
  • I too feel your pain. It is quite natural in ham radio to abbreviate Callsign (our government issued not-quite* unique ids) as 'call'. That was a poor choice for a column name for such things, since user defined procedures in SQL have to be invoked by a call keyword. I had to expand the column name such that it is wider than the longest likely value (except Roman Italic compresses Callsign more than Roman Bold does WB1GOF) http://fd.ema.arrl.org/History.php [arrl.org]

    * why 'not quite unique? Two issues --

    1. A call
    --
    Bill
    # I had a sig when sigs were cool
    use Sig;