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Ovid (2709)

Ovid
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Stuff with the Perl Foundation. A couple of patches in the Perl core. A few CPAN modules. That about sums it up.

Journal of Ovid (2709)

Monday October 03, 2005
05:58 PM

The Root of All Evil is ...

[ #27004 ]

Many people cite the famous quote "Premature optimization root of all evil", but that's just a specific case of a more general problem: trying to fix things that aren't identified as a problem. YAGNI is God.

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  • Many people cite the famous quote "Premature optimization root of all evil", but that's just a specific case of a more general problem: trying to fix things that aren't identified as a problem. YAGNI is God.

    I, of course, agree completely :-)

    However it can be tricky to pull off if different people have different ideas of what a "problem" is. To me, duplicate and/or unclear code is a big problem. Something that needs fixing straight away. Other people don't seem to think that way unfortunately.

  • The problem of course, is that YAGNI also stands for You Are Gunna Need It, and it's often bloody difficult to tell which one it is.

    I have this happen regularly. I admit I tend to be a bit "visionary" and see further ahead than many, and as a result a lot of my first implementations tend to be very general. They used to often be overly general, although I've tried to retrain myself a bit more lately.

    The problem of course is that when you think you Ain't gunna need something that will be hard to change to us
    • I haven’t had any luck trying to track this down, but Knuth is said to have something along the lines that each problem in software can be solved with either more or less abstraction, and that experience tells us which one is the way to go.

      (If someone has a citation, I’d love to know it.)

  • My take is that any code that's written that doesn't need to be written, including any generalization, is by definition premature.
    --

    --
    xoa