Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

use Perl Log In

Log In

[ Create a new account ]

DAxelrod (4649)

DAxelrod
  (email not shown publicly)

I'm interested in hard problems.

Recently, I've started thinking a lot about what CP6AN might look like.

Class::MOP and the Perl 6 Metamodel make me more excited than I'd like to admit.

Also expect occasional wordy technology-related rantings.

Journal of DAxelrod (4649)

Monday February 19, 2007
09:59 PM

Concurrency and assumptions

[ #32445 ]

I'm convinced that some problems are considered hard mainly because they're really good at exposing unquestioned assumptions at different levels of a system.

Barrier Please Don’t Rely on Memory Barriers for Synchronization! C++ and the Perils of Double-Checked Locking
Barrier The Problem with Threads The Problem with Threads

In concurrency, one of those levels having its assumptions challenged is the programmer, but that's not the only reason it's hard.

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • A nice collection to add to my bookmarks, and serious food for thought. My only nit is the title of the last article: "threads" has come to mean many things, I think a better title might be "The Problem With Threads As Fibers", not the possibly implied "The Problem With Threaded Concurrency".

    I hope people take time to read the articles before just assuming they're another reason to dismiss/avoid Perl's threads. ithreads has its issues, but applying some of the techniques in Lee's article may mitigate the

    • This issue with assumptions if why I removed as many as I could and came up with Process.pm :)

      I'm having fairly good success with it for things other than actual parallel processing (running different parts of a program across two different versions of Perl).

      I'm hoping it's going to be a slam dunk when the time comes to do some serious work with it.